Author Topic: Tassie 14/15...Rumpig version  (Read 21045 times)

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Offline Rumpig

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Re: Tassie 14/15...Rumpig version
« Reply #45 on: October 23, 2015, 09:36:40 PM »
DAY 40 - COLES BAY

Most of the household has a sleep in this morning, eventually they all get up and have brekky before we get ready to head off to the Coles Bay area for the day. With everything we need packed in the vehicles for a day out, i go start my fourby but the battery is dead. Testing the start battery with my multimeter it reads 9.9V....it's cactus. I jump start the vehicle off the second battery, it fires to life and i then head up the road a few hundred metres to the local BP service station to try and get a new battery. I don't like my chances of getting a battery in a smallish town like this on a Saturday morning, but miraculously they have one battery left in the size i want with the terminals the right way around, and it only cost me $180. Not wanting to clog up their driveway being space is at a premium here, i drive back to the house and then swap the batteries over on the road out front. With my fourby all fixed, we then head off for the day, back towards where we had spent yesterday afternoon at Friendly Beaches.

SWAPPING OUT THE CACTUS BATTERY FOR THE NEW ONE



The run North up the highway is uneventful, we take the right turn off the highway we need to take onto Coles Bay Rd, and then follow this until we reach the town itself. Our quad bike / polaris ride isn't until 1.00 p.m today, so we have the morning to do some exploring of the area. As we come into Coles Bay we see the place we need to go to later today on the righthand side, so make note of it's location and continue on along the main road towards Freycinet. We eventually take a lefthand turn onto Cape Tourville Rd, and follow this almost to it's end before turning onto a dirt track that takes you down to Bluestone Bayabout a kilometer before the lighthouse. There's a sign stating this track is for 4wd vehicles only, it's not a hard track by any means, and in the dry a high clearance 2wd vehicle could likely negotiate it. The majority of the track has a few minor washouts on it and is pretty easy stuff to navigate, the only place a non 4wd vehicle may struggle though is right at the end of the track where it decends down to the bay itself, as it does get slightly more rutted out there. Soon enough we are parking the vehicles up at the end of the track, the carpark area being literally a stones throw away from the waters edge. Bluestone Bay is completely different to most other parts of Freycinet, it's shore is not covered in sand, but covered with pale blue and pink boulders instead.  We spend abit of time looking about here and taking pics of the area, and by coincidence we actually meet up with the guide who will be leading our bike ride tour this afternoon. I have a quick chat with him (pretty quick really as he was leading another tour at the time), and he mentions that this is where he was going to bring us this afternoon on the tour, but seeing as though we are here now, he'll take us to another location they also go to instead.

SIGN AT START OF THE "4WD" TRACK



IT'S A PRETTY EASY GOING TRACK REALLY



BLUESTONE BAY





We say goodbye to our guide for now, then jump back in our vehicles and head back out to the bitumin of Cape Tourville Rd. We make a left turn onto the bitumin and drive the short distance to the end of the road, which is a car park area for the Cape Tourville Lighthouse. Built in 1971, this unmanned automatic lighthouse replaced the Cape Forestier Lighthouse which used to be located at Lemon Rock, another jutting off the Freycinet Peninsula which i believe lies South East of Wineglass Bay. It's quite busy here at the lighthouse, we struggle to find 2 vacant car parks for both our vehicles to park in.... i find a spot straight up, and eventually when someone else leaves Jeff parks his vehicle aswell. There's a short 600mtr long circuit walk of you can do here, we actually don't have time to do it at the moment due to needing to get going soon to make our quad bike ride, so we just opt to have a quick look at the view of the ocean from the boardwalk that is here, and we'll try and make time to come back later this afternoon if we get the chance for a better look around. We take a few pics whilst checking out the spectacular views to be found here, then it's back in the vehicles once again and we head to the office of All4Adventure back at Coles Bay.

CAPE TOURVILLE LIGHTHOUSE



LOOKING SOUTH TOWARDS WINEGLASS BAY FROM THE LIGHTHOUSE BOARDWALK



THE NUGGETS...THERE'S 4 SEPERATE LITTLE ISLANDS THAT MAKE UP THIS FEATURE JUST OFF OF CAPE TOURVILLE



Arriving at All4Adventure headquarters i go inside the building to do some paperwork and pay for our tour, it's then that i am given the news that one of the Rangers we have booked for today isn't running at the moment, and the guys are out the back trying to repair it as we speak. We're not real happy to hear this news as Jeff and myself were really looking forward to driving a Polaris Ranger each today, our only option now is that both our kids hop in the Ranger with one of us adults (as they are a 3 seater), and the other adult gets to ride on a quad bike instead. We don't have much of a choice in the matter, we can see the guys working frantically out the back trying to fix the busted vehicle all to no avail, so we say we'll do the quad bike and Polaris Ranger combination, but we want to swap around on the machines part way through the tour.... which they happily agree to let us do.
With the paperwork completed and money handed over, we make our way a few hundred metres across the other side of Coles Bay Rd, to where the rest of the working vehicles are waiting for us. The first half hour of the tour is spent doing a training / practice session , so that the tour guide knows we are capable of operating the vehicles we'll be driving today. They are all pretty straight forward machines to operate, there's no clutch to worry about, just an accelerator, brake and gear selector. There's atleast about a half dozen other quad bike riders coming along on our tour today, we all take turns weaving in and out of a course as directed, and Jeff and i have to quickly swap from one vehicle to the other so the guide knows we are competent in both machines we'll be operating this afternoon. With the training course done and everyone seeming to know what they need to be doing, we then head off into the bush along a dirt track.  As i mentioned earlier we were originally going to be taken to Bluestone Bay on this tour, but seeing as though we'd been there already today, we are now heading to South Friendly Beaches instead. First up on the ride Jeff is driving the Polaris with both the kids, and i am riding the quad bike. The ride is nothing hard to do, there's a few people along for the ride today that don't strike me as normally being the most adventurous type (both males and females), and they had no issues at all negotiating the wash outs and very slight side slopes we encountered along the way. After a while our first stop for the tour is at an old abandoned tin miners shack. Tin was first mined in the area back in the 1870's, work was centred on Saltwater Creek (north of Coles Bay) and Middleton Creek with limited success, and most operatins in the area were pretty short-lived.

JEFF AND THE KIDS IN THE RANGER



OLD TIN MINERS SHACK WE STOP AT ALONG THE WAY



MY DAUGHTER ON THE QUAD BIKE I WAS RIDING



Our guide gives us a good run down on the area and it's tin mining past, it's a short stop here and then we push on to South Friendly Beaches. Arriving at the beach we park the vehicles up in the small car park area at the end of the track, and our guide has some snacks and drinks for us that were included in todays tour price. If you have a good map of the area that shows all the tracks, you can actually drive your own 4wd to this area we are currently at. The spot we are at is actually where we were looking South to yesterday when we were at Friendly Beaches for the afternoon.  It's approximately 8 klms North from here to where we were yesterday, and if you were keen enough to walk this section of beautiful beach, you'd likely have it all to yourself. With our drinks and snack break over, we jump back on the bikes / polaris and head back to where we left from at the start of the trip. On the run back to base i drive the polaris whilst Jeff rides the quad, we take a few small detours along some other tracks on the run back, but mostly we follow the same route back that we went to South Friendly beaches on. Almost back at base we detour along a track that ends with a steepish loose climb up a hill that has some decent wash outs in it. I'm actually surprised at how well the Polaris fights and grabs for grip on the loose surface, it's pretty good fun driving one of these things. With our tour completed we park the vehicles up back where we left from a few hours earlier, and are joined by our wives here who had taken Jeffs 4wd into town, and lazed about at the pub having lunch.

LOOKING NORTH FROM SOUTH FRIENDLY BEACHES



THE TRACKS WE DROVE WERE FAR FROM EXTREME, BUT THEY DID GET SLIGHTLY HARDER THEN PICTURED HERE



MYSELF AND THE KIDS IN THE POLARIS ON THE RETURN RUN TO BASE



From here we all jump back in our 4wd's and head back through Coles Bay to Freycinet, where we plan to do the walk to the lookout for Wineglass Bay. Parking up in the car park area here we jump out of the vehicles and are greeted by a kangaroo that is wandering about the area. There's a few overseas tourist amazed at seeing a kangaroo in the wild, likely for their first time i'd hazard a guess, we let the kids have a bit of a close up look at it before then continuing on to do our walk. The walk to the lookout is a steep uphill walk along a rocky, well-constructed track , there's plenty of steps to negotiate along the way, so it'll give your knees a good work out.  It's 1.5 klms from the start of the walk to the lookout itself, then another 1.5 klms back again...though it feels like 5 times that distance going there, as it's pretty much uphill all the way there. The kids all do well walking to the lookout, we stop a few times along the way for rest breaks, and after a while arrive at the lookout.
It's not a bad view out over Wineglass Bay here, though i do make the comment to Jeff that i am a little underwhelmed with what i am seeing....and he agres with me. You always hear of people raving about Wineglass Bay when they've been to Tassie, i guess we really needed to walk down to the bay itself though to see if that's what they are on about. The view from the lookout is nice as i mentioned already, but we've seen so many spectacular views throughout Tasmania in the near on 5 weeks we've already been travelling  throughout this state, that this view just doesn't blow us away as much as we'd have expected it to do before coming here. Maybe next time we visit Tasmania we'll do the walk down to the bay and see if that is what people rave about, but for now this will have to do us here. We take some family pics and then start on the walk back to the car park.

ROCK FEATURE ALONG THE WALK TO WINEGLASS BAY LOOKOUT



BE PREPARED TO NEGOTIATE A HEAP OF THESE AS YOU DO THE WALK



THERE'S THIS GREAT SEAT TO TAKE A BREAK AND RELAX ON PART WAY ALONG THE WALK ALSO



FAMILY PIC AT THE WINEGLASS BAY LOOKOUT



Back at our vehicles and the walk has taken us approximately an hour and a half to complete all up, we grab some cold drinks from the fridge in the back of the fourby, then it's time to make tracks once again. From here we head back Cape Tourville Lighthouse which we briefly visited earlier today, this time we have no problems at all getting car parks, as there's only one other vehicle here now. We do the full circuit walk and read the information boards they have located along the way aswell....it's quite nice being here late in the afternoon with practically nobody else about. One thing i will say though about coming to the lighthouse at this time of the afternoon versus earlierin the day, is that you get much nicer photographs earlier in the daydue to the shadows now on the sheer rock faces to what i pictured earlier in todays posting.
With our walking done for the day it's time to head back to the house at Swansea. It's an uneventful drive back to the house, and when we get there we get dinner going straight away which is a roast pork. Dinner is a pretty late affair tonight being the hour we got home at, it doesn't matter though as we're on holidays, and are just taking everything as it comes at whatever time it happens to occur. We spend the evening watching the One Day Cricket on the television, before calling it a night and heading off to bed.
Just a heads up...Jeff has changed his signature due to being foolish enough to leave his account logged on when he borrowed my phone.
I preferred his signature i'd written there myself before he changed it...lol
Nice try Grasshopper!!!!!

Offline Rumpig

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Re: Tassie 14/15...Rumpig version
« Reply #46 on: October 31, 2015, 08:46:50 PM »
DAY 41 - SWANSEA TO OATLANDS

Time for us to move camp today, so we load everything back into the campers from the house we have been renting the past few days, and hit the road. First up we have to drop the key to the house back at the motel that we got it from, we do this and then head to the Bark Mill bakery to grab some brekky. This eaten it's time to leave town, we head North for about 55klms back along the Tasman Hwy, and then take a left turn onto the Lake Leake Hwy to start heading West. Traffic is pretty light on / non existent really, and once we get a bit of a long climb up a range out of the way, it's a nice easy scenic drive into Campbell Town after that.

HEADING FOR CAMPBELL TOWN



We hadn't really planned on stopping in Campbell Town originally, but something one of us (not sure who it was now) read along the way made us take a right turn instead of our planned left turn at the T insersection of the Midland Hwy, and head into there. We are so glad we made the decision to head into this town, be sure you stop here if in the area as it has plenty of stuff well worth seeing. Originally established in 1821 by Governor Macquarie as one of the four garrison town and probation stations between Hobart and Launceston, we park our vehicles up on the side of the highway in the main street and hop out to find we are at the very start of the Convict Brick Trail. The Convict Brick Trail is literally a trail of bricks layed down on the footpath in High St, and is dedicated to the nearly 200 000 convicts that were transported to Australia between the years 1788 and 1868. Over 70 000 of these convicts were tansported to Tasmania, and most of these people travelled through the town of Campbell Town at some stage of their journeys through the state. Each brick in the trail has the convicts name,  their age,  the ship & arrival date,  their crime & length of sentence. The first brick was laid by Mayor Kim Polley on August the 28th 2003, it is dedicated to those who died on their way to Australia either by disease or misfortune. Reading the other bricks it's hard to work out how the judges came up with the sentences that each convict got handed to them, many of the crimes seems rather minor for the period of time they have been sentenced to, and there doesn't seem to be consistency in time people get to serve for the offences they had commited. Located here where we have parked our vehicles at the start of the trail is also the Foxhunters Return, which is a convict built building that today still has the holding cells beneath it`s floors where the convicts were held at night. We didn't actually go inside this building to check the cells out for ourselves, as we sadly weren't aware at the time that they were there.

THE CONVICT BRICK TRAIL IN CAMBELL TOWN



I COULDN'T WORK OUT HOW ONE CONVICT WAS SENTENCED TO 7 YEARS FOR THEFT OF WOOL & RUM, YET ANOTHER COPPED LIFE FOR THEFT OF A BROOCH





Also located here at the start of the Convict Brick Trail, is the Red Bridge. This bridge is the oldest surviving brick arch bridge in Australia, and the oldest bridge still in use on an Australian National Highway. It was entirely built using convict labour, and each convict was paid six pence per day for the work they did, with 220 convicts working on the bridge at the peak of it's construction . The convicts hand made the 1,250,000 bricks used in it's construction, and the bridge originally was built on dry land. Upon the bridges completion, the convicts were then instructed to divert the river to run beneath it's arches. To achieve this diversion, convicts had to dig a new river course one kilometre either side of the newly constructed bridge, a massive feat of it's own to achieve without the aid of modern day machinery.

THE RED BRIDGE SPANNING THE ELIZABETH RIVER



1,250,000 HANDMADE BRICKS WERE USED IN IT'S CONSTRUCTION



AS THE STONE SIGN LAYED IN THE BRIDGE SAYS... IT'S 41 MILES (66KLMS) TO LAUNCESTON



Directly across the road from the start of the Convict Brick Trail is Blackburn Park, so named after James Blackburn who was the designer of Red Bridge. Back in the 1930's, 3 Macrocarpa trees were planted on this location, and just like in the town of Legerwood that we have visited previously on our trip, these trees would later have to be felled for safety reasons. Eddie Freeman who is the chainsaw artist that carved those memorial trees in Legerwood originated from here in Campbell Town, he has turned these 3 Macrocarpa trees into similar works of art, with these trees depict the towns "natural and human history of the region".
Quote
One tree closest to Red Bridge features a heritage theme with a British Soldier guarding a convict labourer during the construction of Red Bridge. Another tree highlights the region’s natural rich aquatic and terrestrial wildlife complete with platypus, duck, trout, Tasmanian Devil, dragonfly and more.
A third tree pays tribute to prominent people in Campbell Town’s history, Governor Macquarie and his wife; bushranger Martin Cash, Dr William Valentine and Harold Gatty, while the sheep and wool bales represent the Campbell Town Show, the longest running annual show in Australia. These sculptures capture the very essence of this beautiful town and region, and are a perfect tribute to the history of Campbell Town.


BLACKBURN PARK TREE CARVINGS










We have a bit of a look around town after checking out the tree carvings, and try to locate The Black Bridge that i'd just read about which is supposably here also, but we are unsuccessful in our search for it. Made of bluestone it carries the railway through the east of the town, but we didn't have any actual directions to it's location, so we just drove around the area trying to locate it. In our search for the Black Bridge we did stumble upon a free camp that is located here in town also, the Lions Park is a nice enough spot to make camp for a night if your looking for somewhere to stay about the area.
With our look about Campbell Town done, we head out of town along the Midland Hwy in a Southerly direction. Our next stop for the day is only about 12klms down the highway, it's the small town of Ross. Just before you reach the turn off on the highway for Ross you'll go past a large 42 degree sign that is loacted in a field to your East. This sign is located here as it refers to the 42 degree South latitude, which is the location of all points approximately 4650klms South of the equator. This "line" passes through Tasmania just North of Ross, and also passes through the South island of New Zealand, and through Chile and Argentina in South America aswell. The township of Ross is apparently the only town of any size close to this "line" anywhere along it's length, hence why they put this large sign in the field where they have done so.

THE 42 DEGREE LATITUDE SIGN JUST NORTH OF ROSS



After passing the sign in the field we then take our exit to the left and drive into the town of Ross. Very much like the previous town we had just visited, Ross has a rich convict history and like Campbell Town also has plenty of beautiful old sandstone buildings to be found in it. We drive into the centre of town and then park our vehicles up in a carpark area by the banks of the Macquarie River. Located here beside the park is the Ross Bridge, a beautiful old sandstone bridge constructed by convict labour once again in 1836, and is the third oldest bridge still in use in Australia. We spend some checking this bridge out and photographing it, the detailed carving work in the sandstone is amazing to view, something we just don't see in todays modern engineered buildings.

THE ROSS BRIDGE



THE BRIDGE WAS COMISSIONED BY LIEUTENANT - GOVERNOR ARTHUR




THE DETAIL IN THE SANDSTONE CARVINGS IS AMAZING TO VIEW



ANOTHER MILE MARKER SIGN ON THIS BRIDGE ALSO, JUST LIKE THE RED BRIDGE HAD....69 MILES TO HOBART



From the bridge we walk back into the centre of town to "The four corners of Ross". This cross roads in the centre of town has a war memorial as the central feature of the instersection, complete with a field gun from the Boer War. The four conrers of the intersection each have a label, "Temptation" refers to the corner with the Man O' Ross Hotel on it, "Recreation" has the Town Hall on that corner, "Salvation" corner has Roman Catholic Church, and "Damnation" was the old Jail.
We turn right and start to walk up the hill to the Wool Centre, this museum gives a good insight into the towns heritage and its historical links to wool growing in the area.
With our look about the Wool Centre done we continue walking up the street some more and stop in next at the Uniting Church that sits prominently on the hilltop. Built in 1885, it's Gothic style architecture is stunning to view, and this church is also noted for its blackwood pews and carved baptismal.

LOOKING DOWN CHURCH STREET TOWARDS THE "4 CORNERS OF ROSS", THE STONE BUILDINGS IN THIS TOWN ARE STUNNING TO VIEW



IT'S THE LITTLE DETAILS IN THE STONE WORK THAT REALLY SETS THE BUILDINGS OFF



ROSS UNITING CHURCH



MEMORIAL AT UNITING CHURCH TO THE PIONEER METHODISTS OF ROSS



From the Uniting Church we continue walking on exploring the town, our next stop is at The Female Factory. The Female Factory was one of four female factories established in Tasmania, and this one located at Ross ran from 1847 to 1854. There's not much in the way of architecture remaining at this site above ground these days, but apparently it's the "most archaeologically intact female convict site in Australia". Situated here is a museum that outlines the roll this place played in our countries convict past. Female prisoners were used in a manufacturing industry here, they could be hired out to be used as domestic servants and the like, but would be  sent back to the factory for punishment if they were charged with an offence by their master or mistress.

ROSS FEMALE FACTORY...THE BUILDING ON THE RIGHT IS THE MUSEUM



A PATHWAY ACROSS THE ROAD FROM THE FEMALE FACTORY THAT LEADS TO THE TOWNS CEMETRY



We finish up at the Female Factory and the afternoon is starting to get away from us, so we start to head back to our vehicles. I'd spoken to someone earlier as we walked about the town who mention viewing the original stables for the military garrison horses out the back of the Uniting Church which we'd visited earlier, so we pay these a visit next.

OLD MILITARY GARRISON HORSE STABLES AT ROSS



There's so much to see in the towns of Campbell Town and Ross which we've just visited, that we have really only scratched the surface of both these towns.... i'd love to come back here again sometime in the future and spend a few days looking through the towns fully. Time however is against us, and it's time to move on to the town of Oatlands, which is our planned camp for tonight. It's only about 36 klms drive to Oatlands from Ross, so before we know we've reached our camp location, a free camp on the banks of the Lake Dulverton Wetland. You have a choice of 2 places to camp in town here, if it's to full by the banks of the wetland, there is a large overflow area up behind the towns windmill, which is just across the road.

TONIGHTS FREE CAMP IN THE TOWN OF OATLANDS



LAKE DULVERTON WETLANDS



After several nights holed up in a house, we were thinking ow nice it would be tonight to be once again sitting around a campfire enjoying a few rinks. Sadly for us this didn't turn out to be the case though, the wind is blowing to strong this afternoon / tonight to get a fire going, so the firewood we ought about a week ago now, is still of no use to us. I take the kids across the road to the overflow camp area, there's a playground located here, so they burn off some energy playing on it. As the sun starts to set we head back to camp and have dinner, then put the kids to bed for the night. We ask Sara and Jeff to keep an eye on the kids for us, then Leanne and myself head up to the Callington Mill to try and get some night time pics of it. We manage to get a few nice shots of the windmill lit up at night, then head back to our camper and call it a night, it's to cold and windy to sit outside and enjoy the evening.

THE PLAYGROUND BEHIND THE CALLINGTON MILL



THE PLAYGROUND EVEN HAS SOME NICE TIMBER CARVINGS IN IT



THE CALLINGTON MILL AT NIGHT



ANOTHER NIGHT TIME PIC OF THE WINDMILL

Just a heads up...Jeff has changed his signature due to being foolish enough to leave his account logged on when he borrowed my phone.
I preferred his signature i'd written there myself before he changed it...lol
Nice try Grasshopper!!!!!

Offline Rumpig

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Re: Tassie 14/15...Rumpig version
« Reply #47 on: November 06, 2015, 11:24:30 PM »
DAY 42 - OATLANDS TO ARTHURS LAKE

We wake to a nice morning but the wind gusts start to pick up as we pack up camp. There's no rush to do much this morning, our plan is to tour the Callington Mill that we photographed last night, and it doesn't open until 9.00 a.m. I grab the camera and take a few pics of the bird life that calls the wetlands we camped beside home, they seem content to keep some distance from people, but do let you get close enough to snap a decent pic of them also. With everything packed away and a small brekky eaten, we drive around the corner and park our vehicles up on the main street near the centre of town.

A COUPLE OF PICS OF SOME OF THE BIRDLIFE TO BE FOUND AT THE WETLANDS





With our vehicles parked up, we hop out and do a short walk in the main street checking out some of the sandstone building that Oatlands has in it. Surprisingly to me... Oatlands is considered to have the largest number of colonial sandstone buildings in any town in Australia, i myself would have thought a town such as Ross or Evandale would have more sandstones buildings in it, but apparently i'm incorrect.

A RANDOM PIC I TOOK WALKING AROUND THE TOWN... the windmill is a pretty dominate feature in this town



We next head over to the mill and book to do a tour of it, and the cost is $40 for a family to do this. The first tour doesn't start until 10.00 a.m, so we have about 30 minutes to kill off...tours take about 45 minutes to do and run on the hour until 3.00 p.m.
With half an hour to spare we walk around the gardens that are located beside the mill, taking pics of both the gardens and the windmill. Someone has put a lot of time and effort into the garden that is located here, and their hard work does not go unnoticed by us....it is nice to stroll around here in this mornings sunshine. Half an hour goes past pretty quickly and before we know it we are lining up to do our tour.
The Callington Mill was originally built back in 1837 and was operated by several different owners in it's working life, it's the third oldest windmill in Australia and today is the only operating mill of its type in the Southern Hemisphere. Callington Mill operated as a fairly successful venture until the new railways bypassed the town in the 1870's, this benefitted the larger mills located around the northern & southern parts, and then the banks forclosed on the mills last owner in the depression years of 1892 - 93, with the mill then eventually falling into a state of disrepair. Restoration of the mill was completed in 2010, and today if you're lucky you can see the mill running on wind power, grinding the locally grown produce that makes the flour the souvenier shop next door sells.
I'd like to show you some pics that we took of inside the mill, but sadly this is not possible.... due to the highly combustible nature of being inside a mill such as this, all cameras, phones and electrical devices are confiscated before you can do the tour, and locked away in a safe storage area until your tour is completed. Our tour guide is not only enthusiastic, but super knowledgable on all aspects of the mill and it's runnings, i doubt there's a question you could throw at him about the mill that he wouldn't have had an answer to. Now i'd like to say that whenever you visit this mill you are guaranteed to see it running on wind power via it's large sails you see on the outside of the building, but mother nature being what it is, this isn't always the case.  Luckily for us today however, whilst about 3/4 of the way through our tour a couple of guys rock up and get the mill running in operation. We literally get to see the mill being started up right before our eyes, Jeff and myself even race back up the internal ladders to the top floor, to see how all the gears work with each other to spin the mill stones down below.  It was quite fascinating seeing how everything operates inside the mill, a major bonus was having them start the windmill up whilst we were inside it.
With our tour then completed, we get our electronic devices back and then head over to a private room in the cafe building. As part of the tour package, we get to do a tasting of some scones made from the flour the mill produces. The scone you get to taste is a fairly small portion really, they are tasty with the jam and cream on them, but basically just wet your appetite for wanting more. With the tour now completed we then head in next door to the actual cafe area, and i order a proper serve of scones with jam and cream on them to go.

OUR TOUR OF CALLINGTON MILL



ANOTHER PIC TAKEN FROM THE GARDEN AREA BESIDE THE WINDMILL



ANOTHER PIC FROM INSIDE THE GARDEN AREA



RANDOM PIC TAKEN AT THE BACK OF THE SAME GARDEN AREA



Now i know i have ordered some scones to go, but i'm not in the good books with the misses for doing so. Yes i am supporting the local economy by buying these, but we are actually headed directly from here across the road to the Pancake and crepe shop to have some brunch (you know, a combination brekky and lunch). My arguement for buying the scones is that i need the energy boost to get me the 150 mtrs away to where the shop is for brunch, but i don't think it's all that convincing really...lol. We manage to grab the last few spare tables in at the Pancake and Crepe shop to dine at, it's quite a popular little place to eat at, we'd heard from other fellow campers by the wetlands that the food here is quite nice. We ordered and then ate our meals, and i will concur that the meals are pretty nice here...Jeff even managed to woof down a dessert creep to go with his main meal he'd eaten.
With lunch out of the way, we head up to the local IGA store to replenish our food and drink supplies, Jeff and i drive the vehicles up there, whilst the wives walk off lunch to the store with the kids in tow. Once this is done we then head on out of town. Leaving Oatlands we cross over the Midland Hwy onto Interlaken Rd and head up towards Interlaken. It's a nice scenic route we take on this drive with much of the road being dirt along the way, and we pass along the Eastern edge of Crescent Lake as we go. We spot our second wombat of the trip along this road somewhere, sadly it's another dead one just like the last one was, and it's smack bang in the middle of the road. I thought about straddling it with the 4wd as we drove by but it was way to big to do that, so i ended up squeezing by one side of it, only just having enough room to stay on the road as i went past.

ON THE ROAD TO INTERLAKEN



We reach Interlaken and vere left on the road across an isthmus of sorts between Crescent Lake and Lake Sorell. We intend to camp the night at a campground located at Lake Sorell, though i'm very surprised to see waves breaking here on the Southern shoreline of this lake. The wind that is blowing at the moment is whipping up some decent wave action here, we hope the campground is located in an area that gives us some protection from this wind, otherwise we'll be looking elsewhere for a spot to stay tonight.

WAVES BREAKING ON THE SHORELINE AT LAKE SORELL



We soon take the turn off for the campground and head on into it, we find quite a few houses located here that seem to be in use by people, but struggle at first to find the main campground area. The playground that is here is pretty overgrown and run down, it doesn't seem to be in use these days by the looks of it. We eventually find the track that leads into the campground area, the further we drive into it, the less it looks like it's been used by many people in a long time. To be brutally honest here, the place had a real weird vibe about it, it was almost like the type of place you'd see in a horror movie, really run down and where campers get hacked to death by some local nutter...lol. We drive all around the camp area and are blown away by how big it is, but it's really weird in that you can tell nobody has really camped here in a very long time. There's the odd spot a single camp site has been set up at during some stage in recent months, but for a place that literally could hold thousands of campers, it's now abandonded and very much overgrown...we don't understand why this is so. We find a spot we think might be suitable to set up camp for the night at, but when we hop out of our vehicles we notice the wind is gusting about the place and it's not that great a spot to stay at as far as flapping canvas all night goes. We make the call to head off and look elsewhere, there's quite a few campsites we can see on our maps further afield about the area, so we'll try our luck at those.

HEADING INTO THE GHOST TOWN CAMPGROUND



We continue following Interlaken Rd towards Highland Lakes Rd, planning on stopping in at Woods Lake which appears to have another campground located at it according to our maps. The road to Woods Lake has a sign saying "Private Road" on it, so we are confused as to whether or not we are allowed to head into this campground we see on our maps or not, in the end we deciding it's best not to drive into there just incase. Lagoon of Islands is the next spot on our maps that shows another campground, we take the turn off for it and are promptly greeted with a locked gate, and a sign saying camping is no longer allowed here, and the lake is now dry. The afternoon by now is starting to get away from us, and we are fast running out of options nearby of where we can camp the night according to the maps we have with us. Arthurs Lake is the next spot we can see with a campground shown on it, so we now head for there.

BACK ON THE BITUMIN AGAIN, HEADED FOR ARTHURS LAKE




Reaching Poatina Rd we take a righthand turn onto it, with the campground being located just past the township of Flintstone...i wonder if Fred and Wilma live there?
As we drive along Poatina Rd we see an echidna crossing the road infront of us, we quickly pull up to grab a pic of it, but man these fellas are quick when they want to run for cover. We jump back in the vehicles after snapping a photo of the echidna, and not more then 500 mtrs up the road we spot another one, though this one runs for cover before we get a chance to photograph it. We soon take the right turn off of Poatina Rd for the Arthurs Lake campground, it's called Pumphouse Bay Campground, and is located a short distance down a good dirt road. We arrive at the campground and find it's quite the popular little spot, well it is atleast with the grey nomad army by the looks of it. It costs $4 per adult a night to camp here, and normally it's $10 for a family. Being tucked up in the North Western corner of a section of the lake, it's pretty sheltered and out of the wind here, so even though this place is a touch crowded for our likings, we make the call to set up camp here for the night. The guy running the place is friendly enough, he only charges us $8 instead of the $10 it should be, and before long we are all set up and relaxing with a drink in hand. This campground as i mentioned is pretty popular with the grey nomads, it seems there are many who are set up here for a stay of quite some time, and speaking to some of them later on, i find this to be the case. Many of the people come here every year and stay for weeks and even a month or more at a time, it's almost like this place is a retirement village away from home for them.

AN ECHIDNA WE SPOT CROSSING THE ROAD



With the camp set up and a fire going it's time for a hot shower, showers cost $2 for 4 minutes here, so you'd best be quick in them. On the way back to the camper from my shower i spot a couple who don't look like they belong here much like ourselves (not grey nomads). The couple look cold sitting at their camp eating their dinner, so i tell them i have a fire going at our campsite, and after they've finished eating to come up and join us by it. Graham and Irene are this couples names, they are travelling Tassie in a G Wagon, and ironically they happen to be from Brisbane just as we are...what's the chances of that...lol. We have our dinner and afterwards Grahan and Irene do come up and join us by the fire. It's a good night spent swapping yarns around the fire with them, and sometime around 11.00 p.m we all call it a night and head off to bed.
Just a heads up...Jeff has changed his signature due to being foolish enough to leave his account logged on when he borrowed my phone.
I preferred his signature i'd written there myself before he changed it...lol
Nice try Grasshopper!!!!!

Offline Rumpig

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Re: Tassie 14/15...Rumpig version
« Reply #48 on: November 12, 2015, 08:56:01 PM »
DAY 43 - ARTHURS LAKE - CAMBRIDGE

WHERE WE ARE NOW



It rained during the night on and off but nothing real torrential at all, just fell lightly. I had the diesel heater running all night lastnight, not only did it help with the coolness of the night, but as i've mentioned previously, it also helps to dry the canvas on the camper when the rain falls. We have a pretty lazy start to the morning with the overcast conditions about, we really don't have anything specific planned to do on our holidays over the next few days that are left here in Tassie, and our thoughts are starting to turn to having to return back home and go back to work soon....what an awful thought that is. I say good morning to Graham and Irene who joined us at our fire last night, and whilst chatting with them another lady walks up and joins in on our conversation. Whilst we chat away, the lady who just joined us mentions that she has recently visted a woodstave pipeline that you may recall we went on a failed search for around Lake Margaret Power Station earlier in this trip. You may also recall earlier in our trip we had visisted The Wall at Derwent Bridge, we had been told by Greg Duncan (the artist who is building The Wall) whilst there, that there was 2 places the woodstave pipeline can be found, one being where we couldn't gain access to at Lake Margaret, and the second location was where this lady had recently visited, which i'd just found out is on the road into a place called Laughing Jack Lagoon. Greg Duncan didn't actually mentioned Laughing Jack lagoon to us as the second location, he mentioned there was a spot South of Derwent Bridge it could be found, but being we had already just travelled from that direction, we said we'd look at Lake Margaret and didn't get the other spots exact location from him.
I finish up my conversation with these people, and after that head over to Jeff to mention i know where we can find a woodstave pipeline that we'd previously fruitlessly searched for. Both Jeff and myself really wanted to see one of these pipelines in the flesh, so we grab out our HEMA and maps and start searching for how far away this Laughing Jack Lagoon is from where we currently are camped.  We find that the lagoon is located only about 20klms out of Derwent Bridge, and it's approximately 70 odd klms from where we are now. Laughing Jack lagoon is completely in the wrong direction from where we sort of planned to head to next, we'd actually decided to head back to Hobart area to spend the last few days of our holiday before the family flies out from the same airport we'd picked them up from on arrival here, but all of a sudden we say what the heck, lets head to Laughing Jack Lagoon instead and go see this pipeline.
With brekky done and dusted and our campers packed up, we hit the road once again. Heading back out to the bitumin road of Poatina Rd, we take a small detour to the left and go check out what Arthurs Lake actually looks like, as we didn't stop to check it out on the way into camp yesterday afternoon. Built back in the 1920's to help with the generation of hydroelectricty at the Poatina Power Station, Arthurs Lake today is also Tasmania’s most popular trout fishery. If you plan to fish here you'll need to have a current Inland Angling Licence, and it's Brown Trout you'll been fishing for, as that's the only trout species they have recorded thus far as being here. Water still gets pumped from the lake for hydro generation, where we stop to check out the lake is actually right beside a big pipeline that runs up a hill way off into the distance, where it is fed into Great Lake to then be used for hydro generation.
Whilst at this location we take a few pics of the lake, and i also take one of my wife standing by the sign saying Arthurs Lake. Arthur was actually the name of my wifes late father who died several years ago, for some reason on our trips we usally manage to get photos of family members names, if we happen to see one along the way.

MY WIFE BESIDE THE ARTHURS LAKE SIGN



SOME OF ARTHURS LAKE



I'M WONDERING IF THIS IS WHY IT'S CALLED PUMPHOUSE BAY CAMPGROUND HERE?



We say goodbye to Arthurs Lake and take a left turn back onto the bitumin of Poatina Rd. We follow this to the T intersection of Highland Lakes Rd and take a right turn onto it, and then head towards Miena direction. Miena is a fairly small lakeside town, being located right on the banks of Great Lake, which is Australias second largest freshwater lake. As we drive to this town the Alpine landscape we pass by on the side of the road is quite pretty to look at along the way, this landscape being how it is due to the fact Miena is one of the coldest places in Tasmania. Arriving in Miena the town itself is basically a heap of holiday shacks by the looks of it to me, i doubt there's a very large permanent population that actually lives here. We take a tour around some of the side streets whilst passing through this town, seeing a nice mixture of old run down shacks, and some pretty new much more expensive architectually designed "shacks" aswell.

OLD SHACK WITH A GREAT VIEW OF THE LAKE...GOTTA LOVE THE ROCKS HOLDING THE ROOF DOWN...LOL



AND THEN AROUND THE CORNER IS THIS FLASHIER LOOKING "SHACK"



SOME OF THE VIEW OF GREAT LAKE



From Miena we continue our drive in a Westward direction along Highland Lakes Rd, where we then take a left turn onto the Marlborough Highway. It's here we on this corner i pull into the Great Lakes hotel / service station to top up my fuel. Yesterday when we left Oatlands we hadn't planned on venturing to far away from anywhere really, so i hadn't bothered to top up my fuel before leaving there. Now we are headed to an area without any options of possible fuel stops along the way, Derwent Bridge being the main nearest town to where we are headed, and it's a 40 klm detour (20 klms each way) out of the way to where we are going. I don't fill my tanks here and only get what i think i'll need, as it's the dearest fuel we enconter in all of our trip throughout Tasmania...$1.59.9 per litre.
With enough fuel onboard now to keep me out of trouble, we continue on along the Marlborough Hwy, following it it's entire length to a t intersection where it meets up with the Lyell Hwy. The Marlborough Hwy was a nice little drive, sections of it were dirt road, but it was in very good condition at the time we drove it. We stopped somewhere along it's length towards the Lyell Hwy end to take a photo of a water canal, i'm always amazed at the ingenuity that has gone into constructing Tasmania's water / hydro schemes whenever i see sections of it throughout the state somewhere.

WATER CANAL FEEDING INTO A PIPELINE, SOMEWHERE ALONG THE MARLBOROUGH HWY



At the Lyell Hwy we take a right turn and head towards Derwent Bridge, but about 20 klms before getting there we take a left turn off of the highway, at the sign for Laughing Jack Lagoon. Once again we are back on a dirt / gravel, and just like the previous dirt road it's in pretty good condition to drive on. Stay on this road and eventually you come to another sign pointing off to the right for Laughing Jack Lagoon. It's right here that you'll find yourself seeing the Wood Stave Pipeline that we have come to see. We turn right onto the track that leads to Laughing Jack Lagoon, and park the vehicles up in the middle of the road to go check out this amazing structure. Built basically in the same fasion as a wine barrel is built,  it is made up of wooden staves, slightly curved pieces of wood that create a circle held together by joints and steel bands. This section of wood stave pipeline is preserved here for it's historical significance, but looking at the leaks it has sprung in numerous places, i fear that the cost of it's future upkeep will mean i doubt it'll still be here when my kids become adults and want to bring their kids here to see it. It's not a small section of timber pipeline you'll find here either, continue on driving into Laughing Jack Lagoon as we did, and you'll see kilometres of this timber pipline running along beside the track. As you drive along the road into the lagoon, you can see where sections of the old timber pipeline have been replaced with modern steel pipeline, so one minute it's timber, then it's steel, then it becomes timber again...it changes like this in several places along the way into the lagoon. We spend quite some time checking out the timber pipeline in a couple of different locations, it's a very simple structure, but it's amazing to look at non the less.

THE ROAD THAT RUNS OFF OF THE LYELL HIGHWAY...it's suitable for 2wd vehicles in dry conditions



JUST FOLLOW THE SIGNS TO LAUGHING JACK LAGOON AND YOU'LL FIND IT



THE WOOD STAVE PIPELINE RUNNING ALONG SIDE THE ROAD INTO LAUGHING JACK LAGOON



PIC OF MY FOURBY BESIDE THE PIPELINE TO GIVE A SIZE COMPARRISON OF IT



ONE OF MANY LEAKS WE SAW IN THE OLD TIMBER PIPELINE



WHERE THE STEEL PIPELINE MEETS THE TIMBER PIPLINE



With a good look at the pipeline done we head into Laughing Jack Lagoon itself to see what's there. I had heard there's a camping spot here at the lagoon, but we didn't actually see anything when we reached the end of the track we were on. I did see where a 2 wheeled track disappeared in amongst the trees in one spot, which may be where it was, but having the camper trailer on the back meant i wasn't going exploring down what could be a dead end track, so in the end we parked up down below the weir wall here and then had a bite to eat for lunch.

AT LAUGHING JACK LAGOON



Lunch eaten and we hit the road once again, we drive the 10 klms back to the main dirt road we'd turned off to head into the lagoon, then make a right hand turn and follow this dirt road through to the Lyell Highway. Not to far along the Lyell highway we pull up to check out another water canal, and then a touch further up the road we pull over to take a pic of the same canal in another location....the amount of water that flows through it is quite impressive to view.

WATER CANAL WE STOP TO PHOTOGRAPH ON THE SIDE OF THE HIGHWAY



When we stopped at the Great Lakes Hotel / service station earlier this morning we got some decent mobile phone reception, at was at this point we decided to ring a few van parks around the Hobart area, and make a booking to stay there for the final couple of days of our holiday time in Tasmania. Barilla Holiday Park in Cambridge is where we settled on choosing in the end, and this is where we are headed to now. As we crooze along the Lyell Highway, somewhere between Tarraleah and Ouse i think it was, we are flagged down by a person who's vehicle has broken down. They have pulled off the road into a side dirt track, so we pull in here to see what their problem is. We find it's a young overseas / backpacker fella and 3 girls driving in a Commodore sedan that appears to have overheated. Talking to the guy who owns the car, we find out he's only just bought it from a caryard recently, and they are currenty heading towards Queenstown. Luckily for them we have a heap of water with us, we slowly start putting it into the radiator, but it's a slow process being the engine is quite hot currently and takes a fair bit of filling. Whilst we are filling the radiator back up for these people another vehicle comes up along the dirt track we are stopped in on, the guys in the vehicle look to be local forestry workers, and one of them seems to know abit about Commodores. Have you checked the oil he asks us almost immediately?, which we hadn't done yet. Checking it we find it's milky in colour, a pretty decent sign it's likely done a head gasket. The guys leave us to keep filling the radiator and continue on their way, they didn't seem real keen to want to help to much really. We eventually get the radiator filled and the vehicle seems to be running ok'ish...the temperature gauge looks to be normal, but who knows how long that'll last for. We give the people all the spare bottles we have and fill them with water, aswell as any bottles they can rustle up. We suggest that they don't continue drivin towards Derwent Bridge direction and head back towards Hobart, as there really isn't much in the way of mechanical repair places until they get to Queenstown if they keep going the direction they are headed in..and we seriously doubt they'd make it that far. They say thanks for the help we have given them, and we leave them there and head off once again.
Further on as we drive along the highway i notice the oil pressure gauge in my fourby drop, i radio to Jeff that i need to stop, and it's then we enter into a tiny township, where we pull into an area to check out my vehicle. Pulling up i pop the bonnet to see if i can see anything out of the ordinary, but all seems ok at a quick glance and there's plenty of oil in the engine. There isn't much i can do if there's something internally wrong with the engine, so i decide to just keep on driving, and if the engine blows up then so be it....i've been wanting to do an engine transplant in the vehicle to something more powerful anyhow...lol. To be honest here, with the overheating issues the engine has had for a few years now, i actually said to my wife before leaving on this trip, that i'd be surprised if the vehicle makes it back home in one piece....i have half expected it to die somewhere along the way. As i drive along i notice the oil pressure gauge keeps jumping all over the place, one minute it's up, the next minute it's right down, so i start to wonder if it's not just a faulty reading it keeps giving...i really have no idea what's going on with it at the moment. The rest of the drive into Cambridge from here is fairly uneventful, it's a touch stressful wondering if the fourby will make it there or not, but in the end the vehicle gets there and still seems to be running ok, other then the oil pressure gauge dropping right down regularly.
We check into the van park at our powered sites, the park seems ok, though the sites aren't huge by any means.

THIS WILL BE OUR LAST CAMP SITES IN TASMANIA



We have a few drinks and the kids have a play in the playground that is here. Dinner then had and it's time for a shower, i don't recall the showers costing anything here, but they are on a timer. The timer runs for 5 minutes of hot water, then there's a wait time until the hot water can come through again, so make sure you're quick or the last part of your shower will be in the cold...lol. The bugs that are attracted to the lights of the ammenties block at night time here are pretty full on, i think it must have something to do with the bushland that surrounds the park...what ever the reason for it, there's hundreds of them on the ground in the shower and toilet block, which could freak out those of you who have insect phobia. A few more drinks had and then it's an earlish night to bed for all of us
Just a heads up...Jeff has changed his signature due to being foolish enough to leave his account logged on when he borrowed my phone.
I preferred his signature i'd written there myself before he changed it...lol
Nice try Grasshopper!!!!!