Author Topic: High lift jacks or exhaust jacks?  (Read 2359 times)

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Taf

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High lift jacks or exhaust jacks?
« on: April 18, 2013, 10:43:51 AM »
Hi All,

Quick question. What do you carry on your rigs
1. high lift jack,
2. exhaust jack,
3. both
The reason i ask is because I already have a high lift jack, but in order to use it i am going to have to get my side steps replaced with something more substantial.  As i was thinking of having some brush bars added anyway i could get the side bars replaced at the same time, but that's obviously going to cost me.

My second option is to just leave the factory steps on, leave the high lift jack home, and buy an exhaust jack. This option will certainly be cheaper, but cheaper isn't always better for the long term.

I want to be sure i am ready for any situation....so which option would be better?

Taf
 

Offline deFuzster

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Re: High lift jacks or exhaust jacks?
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2013, 11:02:27 AM »
Hi Taf

Interesting question  :o

I carry a high lift jack but have never used it in anger on the tracks. The main reason I carry it is for it's non jacking uses. High lift jacks can have a multitude of uses other than just lifting your truck such as basic winching, clamping and spreading.

In fact, using a high lift jack as a jack can be hazardous. Remembering you will be lifting the sprung weight (body) not the wheel directly in most cases so a much higher lift is needed to get a wheel off the ground and with that height comes instability.

I normally use both the OEM screw jack and I also have a hydraulic bottle jack in Sooty with a jacking plate. This gets me out of trouble most of the time and having the 2 jacks has proven to be very handy.

I can see the benefits of a high lift (hence I carry one) but it is always my second choice.

Don't have any real experience with an exhaust jack. Used them a couple of times, but have never had the desire to buy one and carry it on board. They are quite large to store and once again the potential for something to go wrong is always a deterrent.

My pick would be adding a hydraulic bottle jack ($30 on special at REPCO) and a jacking plate. The Jacking plate can be something as simple as a lump of hardwood (not pine!).
50mm x 300mm by 600mm long (2" x 1' x 2') should suffice.

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Taf

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Re: High lift jacks or exhaust jacks?
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2013, 11:43:41 AM »
thanks for the reply mate,
Do you also carry any axle stands?

Taf

Offline deFuzster

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Re: High lift jacks or exhaust jacks?
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2013, 01:03:06 PM »
Nope. I carry enough crap without adding that to the list. LOL

I have however used termite mounds as a ramp/stand before though. Drive the flat wheel up on it so there is enough clearance to get a jack under the axle to change a flat.
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Offline JeffW

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Re: High lift jacks or exhaust jacks?
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2013, 08:06:17 PM »
Taf,

I carry an exhaust jack and have used it a coule of times. I prefer it as IMO it is bit more stable than a high lift and won't spear into the body panels if things move. Mine has a tyre valve fitting so you can inflate with a compressor for more control. The biggest problem I've found though is finding the best place to locate it under the cruiser where there aren't sharp potential jack tearing things poking out and if you do only have factory side steps it will tend to bend them up if that's the only spot you can put it without fear of puncture. But they are good on the softer grounds like sand. I would recommend that if you are removing a wheel that you put the wheel not on the studs under the axle or independent wishbone so that if it should go pear shaped and move or drop on you you can recover the situation much easier from on the wheel than on the ground. Mate have a look under your rig and see what will work/fit. Exhaust jacks are good for helping in a recovery as said they are good on soft ground but don't like sharp things.
I do agree with Mauritz though a good hydraulic jack is a good investment .
RUMPIGS mentor ..... ;-)